IoT Helps You Proactively Manage Chronic Health Conditions

health

In our series on the potential of the IoT for the healthcare industry, so far we’ve looked at healthcare mobile apps and remote patient monitoring (RPM). Both of these topics play into our focus for this week: how health care professionals can harness the power of the IoT to manage their patients’ chronic conditions and to improve outcomes.

Focusing on the “big three” chronic conditions

For the purposes of discussion, we will focus mainly on the “big three” chronic conditions that affect thousands of Americans, cost millions for insurance providers and individuals alike each year and are proven to have better outcomes with close monitoring. These chronic conditions are:

  • Heart conditions – predominantly congestive heart failure (CHF)
  • Asthma (COPD)
  • Diabetes

Tapping into the IoT to affect meaningful change

If health care providers, insurance companies and major health networks focus their initial IoT integration efforts on devices and treatments for chronic conditions that affect so many people, real change may be evident in a short amount of time. Goldman-Sachs researchers David H. Roman and Kyle D. Conlee write:

“From a clinical standpoint, chronic disease management sits at the bulls-eye of the healthcare cost challenge given that these conditions account for a large and growing proportion of overall spend ($1.1 trillion annually, or one-third of total U.S. healthcare expenditure.” (4)

Roman and Conlee go on to explain that these three chronic conditions that cost the most each year – heart conditions (mainly congestive heart failure), asthma (COPD) and diabetes – are the “most fertile ground” for healthcare IoT. That’s because research has shown that remote monitoring of these conditions leads to:

  • Improved patient outcomes – better quality of life
  • Lower adverse events, including trips to the emergency room and doctor’s office
  • Reduced healthcare costs

Therefore, not only does using IoT-connected devices to monitor and manage patients’ chronic conditions have a potential to drastically improve the life of a heart patient or a diabetic, for example, IoT applications in healthcare has the ability to help reduce health care costs for everyone.

Using the IoT to improve outcomes for chronic conditions

In patients with known chronic conditions, the main way that providers can use the IoT and IoT-connected devices is with regular, proactive monitoring. Remote patient monitoring (RPM) connects a medical device – such as a blood pressure cuff or glucose monitor – to a computer at a healthcare facility at which a provider can access and analyze the data. This cumulative data can help providers forecast future events, thus warning the patient ahead of time and also leading to improved future practices that can positively impact all patients with the condition.

Taken a step further, smart IoT-connected devices can be pre-programmed by a health care professional to send a warning or trigger in the event of an adverse effect. For example, a glucose monitor receives a reading in a dangerous range for an elderly diabetic patient and the local life squad is immediately summoned. As Maria Regan of Forbes has written, “By lessening the time it takes to diagnose and treat a patient, smart, internet-connected devices will lead to fundamental improvements in medical care.” Or, in less urgent situations, the IoT-connected blood pressure reader could send an alert to a patient’s cardiologist that readings have been irregular recently and the patient’s medication levels may need assessed.

Time will only tell what emerging technologists in the healthcare field will develop to continue to help manage chronic conditions. Patients who have increased access to technology like iPhones and iPads – and are also taking an increased interest in keeping their health care costs down – will surely help to drive the adoption of these new technologies.

References

Cousins, Mathias, Tadashi Castillo-Hi and Glenn H. Snyder. “Devices and diseases: How the IoT is transforming medtech.” Deloitte University Press. Accessed online.

Regan, Maria. “How the Internet of Things may help save heart attack and stroke victims.” Forbes.com. Accessed online.

Roman, David H. and Kyle D. Conlee. The Digital Revolution Comes to US Healthcare. Internet of Things, Vol. 5. Equity Research, Goldman-Sachs. Published 29 June 2015.

 

Originally appeared on The IoT Collective.

mHealth: Proactively Managing Your Health

mobile-health

Mobile apps that collect, store and transmit health-related data have been around for several years now. They’re a critical element of remote patient monitoring (RPM) and diagnostics, since your smartphone or tablet can serve as the storage repository for health data collected by other sources and IoT-connected devices. Doctors and others in the healthcare field certainly believe that mobile apps have the potential to improve patient care and health. For example, a 2016 study of health professionals found that remote monitoring has the greatest market potential for mobile health apps (Source: research2guidance; eMarketer).

Early concerns with mobile health apps

The FDA writes that mobile health apps “can help people manage their own health and wellness, promote healthy living, and gain access to useful information when and where they need it” (“Medical Mobile Applications”). Early on, providers and consumers alike shared many about surrounding the security and efficacy of these apps:

  • Is my health data secure? 
  • Will using this app really help me to better manage my diabetes?
  • As a provider, will I be held legally responsible if this app is ineffective or causes a patient harm?

…among a myriad of other concerns. In the past few years, however, the FDA has begun more tightly regulating mobile health apps. In so doing, health care providers can more confidently “prescribe” use of these apps to their patients, and patients themselves can feel more comfortable using them.

Capabilities of mobile health apps

The FDA classifies a mobile healthcare app as any of the following:

  • Medical devices that are mobile apps, or meet the definition of a medical device
  • An accessory to a regulated medical device
  • Transform a mobile platform into a regulated medical device

(Source: “Medical Mobile Applications”)

A mobile health app may be as simple as a patient key entering health data such as what they’ve eaten or blood pressure readings they’ve taken at home. Or, the app may be fully integrated to automatically receive readings from a blood pressure machine or glucose monitor, for example, and then securely send that data to the provider’s office. In the event of readings or data that cause alarm and need quick intervention, the app can even be set to trigger an alert to the patient, a caretaker (in the event of an elderly or disabled person) or even the rescue squad.

Technology access and mobile healthcare apps

5 years ago, a lot fewer people had smartphones or tablets. So, access to these technologies to run mobile health apps was certainly a legitimate concern. However, these days, patients of all ages and demographics are increasingly likely to own a smartphone. Of the leading global markets, the United States has the highest smartphone penetration, with 63.5% of Americans expected to use a smartphone in 2017. This shows a substantial increase from the 40% of Americans who had a smartphone in 2012 (Smartphones in the U.S.). So, this access barrier is becoming less and less of an issue as the years go by and even the older populations are familiar with smartphones and tablets.

Additional oversight coming to mobile health apps

In late 2015, an additional governing body for mobile health apps came into fruition, born out of leadership from some prestigious American health organizations. A joint effort between the American Medical Association (AMA), the American Heart Association (AHA)Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) and the digital health non-profit DHX Group, Xcertia will provide guidelines for creating and using mobile health (mHealth) apps. The new organization won’t actually certify mobile health apps – that’s for the FDA to do – but “Xcertia’s guidance is intended for others to use when developing, evaluating or recommending mHealth apps” (O’Reilly).

Leaders of this effort say that the guidelines they provide will help providers realize the full capabilities of mobile health apps – to more proactively manage their patients’ health and enable their patients to live fuller, healthier lives. Eric Peterson, MD, chair of the AMA’s Center for Health Technology and Innovation, said of the power of Xcertia: “The AHA is an evidence-based organization, so we can add an emphasis on evaluation that is critical for the mHealth space to realize its full potential and, truly, deliver better outcomes for patients” (O’Reilly). Time will tell the impact that Xcertia will have on the utilization and quality of mobile health apps, but its founding undoubtedly signals an important step in this technology: the American medical elite taking a true leadership and ownership position in the advancement of mobile apps.

References

“Medical Mobile Applications.” U.S. Food & Drug Administration. Last updated 22 Sept 2015. Accessed online.

O’Reilly, Kevin B. “Safety, efficacy guidelines in store for mobile health apps.” AMA Wire. American Medical Association. Published 13 Dec 2016. Accessed online.

Research2guidance; eMarketer. Greatest market potential of mobile health app categories according to mHealth professionals as of 2016. Accessed from Statista.

Smartphones in the U.S. – Statista Dossier. Accessed from Statista.

 

Originally appeared on The IoT Collective.

IoT Improves Health Through Remote Monitoring

kitty-apple-watch

As I discussed in the first blog post in this series, potential applications for the Internet of Things (IoT) in the healthcare sector run deep and wide. Integrating with the IoT will enable health care providers of the future to see more patients, from a wider geographic area and at lower costs. Data collection and transmission en masse thanks to Electronic Medical Records (EMR) will allow quicker, more accurate diagnosis and treatment of a wide variety of conditions. And – as is the focus for this post – IoT-connected devices can perform remote patient monitoring (RPM) and diagnostics to improve patient quality of life.

Defining remote patient monitoring (RPM)

Goldman-Sachs researchers David H. Roman and Kyle D. Conlee define remote patients diagnostics and monitoring as “devices and applications that allow care providers to keep tabs on chronically ill, recently released, and overall ‘high-risk’ patients” (9). Simply put, remote monitoring devices allow care professionals to gather and analyze their patients’ health data without having to physically see the patient. This allows providers to have round-the-clock visibility into how their patients are doing, and enables them to be more proactive in terms of flagging and responding to potentially adverse health data.

Oftentimes, RPM takes advantage of technology that a patient already has in place in his or her home, such as wireless Internet and a smartphone or tablet. Sometimes, additional equipment such as an electronic blood pressure cuff or blood sugar testing device may need to be connected to the existing home network for health monitoring.

Using IoT-integrated devices to improve patient outcomes 

Research has shown that patients who perform regular monitoring of chronic conditions using IoT-enabled devices have better outcomes than those who don’t take advantage of these technologies. For example, a 2015 study of 269,471 patients with pacemakers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators or cardiac resynchronization therapy found that those patients who spent more time each week using remote monitoring had higher survival rates than those who didn’t use the remote monitoring that was available to them (Niraj, et al.).

Environmental monitoring via the IoT

Another type of health monitoring that IoT-enabled devices can facilitate is environmental monitoring, meaning devices installed in living spaces that enable certain high-risk individuals to live more independently. With remote environmental monitoring in place in homes and assisted living apartments, for example, older or disabled people are able to live more independently for longer. Knowing that a doctor or the life squad will be immediately notified in the event of an adverse health event – such as a spike in blood pressure or drop in blood sugar – can help set families’ minds at ease.

Using RPM to improve patient quality of life

In a 2014 report titled “Connecting Patients with Providers: A Pan-Canadian Study on Remote Patient Monitoring,” Canada Health Infoway writes:

“The role of information technology is a critical enabler to improving health services delivery. As decision-makers consider options for delivering high quality care at the right cost, there is a need for innovative solutions that potentially reconfigure traditional service delivery models. RPM is a critical enabler for this transformation with the potential to incentivize self-management, support the delivery of care in home settings and significantly improve the patient experience.” (Emphasis added)

Indeed, for all patient groups, RPM has the potential to reduce the number of hospitalizations, frequency of readmissions and lengths of hospital stays. Remote monitoring allows for more proactive healthcare that can anticipate patient needs before a situation becomes dire. All of these factors contribute to improving patient quality of life and help to drive down healthcare costs for everyone.

References

“Connecting Patients with Providers: A Pan-Canadian Study on Remote Patient Monitoring: Executive Summary.” Canada Health Infoway. Published June 2014. Accessed online.

Roman, David H. and Kyle D. Conlee. The Digital Revolution Comes to US Healthcare. Internet of Things, Vol. 5. Equity Research, Goldman-Sachs. Published 29 June 2015.

Varma, Niraj, et al. “The Relationship Between Level of Adherence to Automatic Wireless Remote Monitoring and Survival in Pacemaker and Defibrillator Patients.” Journal of the American College of Cardiology 65 (24): 2015. Accessed online.

Originally appeared on The IoT Collective.

An Interpretation: IoT in Healthcare

healthcare-iot

As someone with over a decade of experience in various aspects of healthcare, Cathy called upon me to craft a blog series on healthcare and the IoT. I was charged to think and write about potential applications, how big data is impacting the patient experience and perhaps some real-world use cases.

Sounds simple enough, right? Well, as I dug into stats and studies on one of my favorite research websites, I quickly learned how people define and refer to “Healthcare IoT” runs far and wide – and isn’t really simple in the least. In fact, Forbes contributor TJ McCue reports that by 2020, the IoT in healthcare will be a $117 billion market.

With my years of experience partnering with and writing for hospitals, health networks and doctor’s offices, wanting to better understand how the IoT is impacting healthcare was a no-brainer. Several hours of research in, and I’ve learned that there are many potential applications for the IoT within the healthcare industry, one of the most rapidly changing and technologically evolving verticals in the world.

Framing up Healthcare IoT

Because the IoT in general – as well as Healthcare IOT specifically – is defined by lots of people in lots of different ways, let’s start by shoring up the definition for how I’ll be discussing it. A Goldman-Sachs analysis of the topic by David H. Roman and Kyle D. Conlee provides an excellent starting point for my review of healthcare IoT, so I’d like to use their definition:

“Platforms that create actionable patient data to aid in the treatment or prevention of diseases outside of the traditional care setting, drastically reducing costs in the process.” (9)

Roman and Conlee’s definition is very useful, I think, because they restrict the types of devices, technologies and networks that are included in Healthcare IoT. Instead of considering every gadget and device with an Internet connection and the potential to generate data – as sometimes happens in the burgeoning world of the IoT – we will consider only those technologies that generate, store and transmit meaningful data that have the potential to make a measurable difference in terms of patient experience, quality of care and healthcare costs.

The time is right for Healthcare IoT

You might be thinking that there’s not much to argue with there: of course the healthcare industry should be investing in technologies and practices that improve the patient experience and help to reduce costs at a time when healthcare costs seem to only be rising at an astronomical rate. But, how do we know that now is the right time to invest in the IoT in the healthcare sector? Roman and Conlee provide some pretty convincing proof points:

  • Near-universal digitalization of clinical data with EMR (Electronic Medical Records)
  • Shift from fee-for-service payment model to fee-for-value payment model
  • Dramatic increase in high-deductible insurance plans that transfer more of the health cost burden to consumers
  • Big players – with big dollars – investing in the space
  • High rates of smartphone usage, even among older segments of the population

The potential for big impact with Healthcare IoT

As you can see, there is a lot to explore when it comes to the IoT and possible applications within healthcare. So, for the next few posts in this series I will explore how integration with the IoT can provide real value in the following areas:

  • Remote patient diagnostics and monitoring – How healthcare professionals can use Internet-ready devices to be more proactive, keep patients happier and better manage chronic and acute conditions
  • Telehealth – How technologies like Skype and FaceTime could enable doctors and their staff to see more patients more quickly and from a wider geographical area
  • Behavior modification – How transmitting and storing health data via the IoT can foster healthier lifestyles and lead to measurable improvements in chronic health conditions

What are your initial thoughts and reactions? How do you see the IoT changing the healthcare landscape in the coming months and years?

References

McCue, TJ. “$117 Billion Market for Internet of Things In Healthcare By 2020.” http://www.forbes.com/sites/tjmccue/2015/04/22/117-billion-market-for-internet-of-things-in-healthcare-by-2020/#41c695702471. Published 22 April 2015.

Roman, David H. and Kyle D. Conlee. The Digital Revolution Comes to US Healthcare. Internet of Things, Vol. 5. Equity Research, Goldman-Sachs. Published 29 June 2015.

Originally appeared on The IoT Collective.

Back in the Saddle With Software Development

ux

Things have a funny way of working out sometimes, don’t they? Well, I certainly think so as I find myself as a consultant for a software development team for the second time in my life. 🙂 Like the other software project that ramped up back in summer of 2013, I was brought onto this team in the past couple weeks as an expert in user research and assessing user needs from a qualitative perspective. Sounds fancy, huh? Well, it’s actually pretty simple.

We’re aiming to infuse user-centered design into corporate thinking. We ask real-life users what they need from a software product and how they use it in their everyday job tasks. Once we have some pieces of functionality to show them, we ask them how we’ve done. Then, we iterate from there and make improvements so we are always keeping the user in mind for our development work and product planning. It’s a very rewarding job as we help bring together the product team, development team and other internal teams along with users of their products and services. Oftentimes, it’s the first time the client is really asking users what they need rather than just assuming they already understand their needs. That means we can make a big impact!

Working on this project–along with several others I’ve already had going–means that Q4 is shaping up to be an especially busy quarter. Well, that sounds good to me! Productivity = happiness for this busy-body freelancer 🙂

3 Ways to Make Your Non-Profit Resonate With Supporters

tin-roof

I’ve been involved with non-profits in some capacity for practically my whole life–since my aunt and uncle (with whom I’ve very close) started working in Nicaragua in Central America when I was just 4. They founded the Tin Roof Foundation in the mid-1990s, a 501(c)(3) that is dedicated to equipping kids, young people and families with the skills and tools they need to become self-sufficient, productive members of their communities.

Really in the past 5 years, I have become even more involved with Tin Roof through co-running our Facebook page, developing and executing the marketing and social media strategy for our annual fundraiser and working at the event. Here are 3 ways to make the stories your non-profit tells resonate better with your supporters.

#1: Make It Personal

People love personal stories. When it comes to non-profits–especially those that work in other countries–most donors will never meet the beneficiaries. So, telling personal stories and sharing photos is a super effective way to connect donors to beneficiaries.

#2: Make It Relevant

At the end of the day, we are all human and have the same basic needs: food, shelter, security, love. Making the stories personal also helps to make a foundation’s work relevant to donors–since they can more easily connect with a person whose life has aspects that parallels their own. For example, a mother in the U.S. with a baby and a toddler can connect with a Nicaraguan mother with children of similar ages and, therefore, facing similar challenges of raising and caring for multiple children.

#3: Make It Poignant

When you’re sharing stories about individuals your non-profit helps, making those stories personal and relevant will help to also make them poignant. The stories you share should be touching and impactful. Here at the Tin Roof Foundation, we share the following types of stories that seem to resonate well with our supporters:

  • Young people who have been able to attend secondary school, university or trade school thanks to the support of Tin Roof.
  • Individuals who have been able to start a small business, such as basket weaving, jewelry making or chia plant growing, thanks to the support of Tin Roof.
  • Children who have faced and conquered a debilitating medical condition thanks to Tin Roof, that would have otherwise likely have gone untreated.

Welcoming Silas

silas

May 28th, 2016 was a monumental day in my life, to say the least: we welcomed our son, Silas Daniel Quales. Perfectly healthy and arriving exactly one week before his due date, this little guy (weighing in at 6 lbs, 7 oz) has been such a joy. His timing was impeccable, as my husband was off nursing school for the summer so he was able to stay home to help me with Silas for the first 2.5 months of his life.

I took 6 weeks completely off work, during which time I admittedly got antsy to start back to work. I’m one of those people who is not happy if not productive, which usually means making money 🙂 When I did return to my clients and projects in mid-July, the transition was fairly seamless thanks to Jon also being home with us for another month.

Being a WAHM

Becoming a mom has made me appreciate my self-employed, work-from-home status just about a million times more than I did before. Having an easy going baby certainly helps me continue to be productive during the day at home, and I’ve been able to easily plan meetings and on-site engagements on days when my husband is available or when my family members watch Silas for half days. I plan to keep working diligently to grow my business so I can continue freelancing for years to come, so I can be home with my little boy as he grows up!

With that said, I am currently looking to pick up additional projects in my areas of expertise, including writing, editing, content strategy and qualitative research/analysis. I have about 20 hours a week open at this time for additional work. Just shoot me an email at danielle.quales@gmail.com if you have needs in any of those areas!

2016…off to a great start!

typewriter

I’m way past due for a blog post, so I thought I would write a quick post on what I’ve been up to in 2016 so far. I hope everyone else’s new year is going just as well!

I continue to work as a contract content specialist for my longest-term customer Vantiv, creating Help articles, training content (such as how-to video scripts and PPT decks) and marketing support for their revamped customer-facing payments processing platform, Vantiv iQ. It’s been a huge undertaking; I’ve been on the project since July 2013 when I was brought on to conduct user research in the field. I feel privileged to still be working with the team, and am looking forward to this project coming full circle later this year.

I’ve also been engaged by Vantiv’s Marketing department to write a regular, year-long blog series. I write 20+ research-based blog posts per month about topics of interest to merchants that process electronic payments, including credit and debit cards, EMV chip cards, digital wallet, mobile payments and NFC payments.

While the above two Vantiv projects are a close to 40-hour-per-week commitment, I also continue to support a variety of smaller projects for other clients, including:

  • Serving as a writer on the large website refresh project for Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health. I have refreshed web copy for 5 service lines so far, and continue to be brought in on more content as needed.
  • Serving as project manager and writer for the website refresh of Chicago-based genetic testing company Insight Medical Genetics.
  • Serving as content strategist and writer for the major overhaul of the 1,000+ page intranet site of Intuit.

Let’s work together in 2016! If you need freelance writing, editing or content strategy support, shoot me an email today: danielle.quales@gmail.com.

3 Ways Your Hospital Can Use Periscope

periscope

You’ve probably heard some buzz about Periscope (it hit 10 million users this summer), but have you thought about using it at your hospital?

Here’s why you might want to: Periscope is about seeing the world through someone else’s eyes, in real time. Imagine if you could show the world what life is really like at your hospital. Download the app, browse a map for live streaming video and click on a user to get in on the action.

Once you’ve done that, check out these ideas on how to use Periscope at your hospital:

  • Interviews: Followers love to see other people and hear their perspectives. Use your hospital’s Periscope account to broadcast interviews with a doctor who is pioneering a breakthrough procedure, a nurse who has gone above and beyond or a patient who had a great experience at your facility.
  • Facility tours: Use Periscope to provide followers with a “sneak peek” of facility upgrades you’ve been making, a new wing slated to open next month or your redecorated pediatric floor featuring bright, cheery colors. Provide a brief tour of your labor and delivery area to share with OBs whose patients will be delivering at your hospital.
  • Events: Shoot video of events at your hospital, so that those who can’t be there in person can still share in the fun. Fundraisers, groundbreakings and award ceremonies are great, celebratory occasions to include videos of on your Periscope account.

On Periscope, you don’t have to worry about getting these videos professionally edited. People want “raw,” real footage that provides an insider look into the everyday workings of your facility, your staff and your patients. Viewers want to see your hospital through Periscope, just as they would see it as they walk through your hallways.

Originally appeared on WriterGirl & Associates.

Why Your Hospital Needs a Patient Portal

patient-portal

One of the biggest trends in hospital marketing today is creating patient portals. These portals provide a variety of benefits and services to your staff and patients, in a digital format that’s easy for your patients to use.

Recently, we created more than 25 pages of content to update Indiana University Health’s patient portal. This portal allows patients to view lab results, pay bills and schedule appointments. But we know that not every patient is tech-savvy, so when we wrote the content, we wrote it like we were sitting down with the patient and showing him or her how to use it.

Of course, a patient portal is only useful if patients are actually using it. To help IU Health get patients logged into the portal, we created mini help manuals. For example, the first one we wrote is, “Access Your Account.” This manual shows patients how to log in and get started with the basics of the portal. Such step-by-step tutorials help to alleviate any fears and reduce intimidation about using an online portal.

IU Health’s patient portal is part of their overall EMR (Electronic Medical Record) strategy. With the new healthcare law, hospitals receive compensation when they complete EMRs, and the portal allows patients quick and easy access to their PHR (Personal Health Record). It’s a win-win for everyone. Another benefit of having a patient portal is IU Health can expect to see reduced call volume for their staff, since patients can use the portal to conveniently set appointments or request prescription refills, 24/7.

Need more help convincing your C-suite into updating your patient portal? Here are a few tips.

Originally published by WriterGirl & Associates.