What Type of Content Audit is Right for You?

content-audit

Does the phrase “content audit,” make you want to hide under your desk? Run away and scream? Stress eat all the M&M’s at your desk?

Don’t worry. The idea of doing a content audit for your hospital’s website doesn’t have ruin your day. In fact, a content audit can help make your days easier. A content audit allows you to comprehensively and accurately understand your website better.

All you have to do is pick the content audit that’s right for you. We know that oftentimes, a budget drives breadth and depth of a content audit. But we believe any type of content audit —done well — is going make your website better.

  1. Quantitative auditJust like it sounds, this is a basic list of all of the content in your digital properties. Use this type of audit when you need to quickly determine how much content you have.
  2. Qualitative auditHere you perform a more in-depth analysis of all of the writing, multimedia, accuracy and value of the content. Use this type of audit when you need a deeper understanding of how valuable your content is.
  3. Mapping audit: Here you visualize the content in the form of a site tree, but it’s more than just the Information Architecture (IA). You highlight relationships between the pieces of content, allowing you to understand how deeply layered your site is. Use this type of audit when you need to build a case for creating new content or changing something in your IA.
  4. Rolling audit: This is an ongoing, cyclical process that involves choosing one branch of your site in which to begin your audit, fully auditing that branch and then, in turn, auditing the rest of your site branches. Once you reach the branch in which you began your audit, begin again.
  5. Thin slice audit: When you have limited time or budget, audit a few select pages within a site branch to get a “thin slice” view of the content that lives in this section. We don’t recommend this type as a long-term strategy.

Need help with your next content audit? That’s what we’re here for. Email us today to find out more.

Originally published on WriterGirl & Associates blog.

How Helpful is Your Hospital’s Website?

hospital-website

Is your hospital website designed for the patient? If it’s not, they’ll be unhappy.

Need proof? Kentico Software recently released a survey that showed 71 percent of people said their healthcare providers’ website could be more helpful.

The survey also uncovered a list of the top “wish list” items that patients want. Take a look at the top three items on the wish list, along with ideas on how WriterGirl is helping our clients make their websites more helpful.

  • Making “Contact Us” easier. The contact page — with its prominent location in the top site navigation — provides multiple options for contacting Houston Methodist. Patients can use an online form to schedule appointments or call to make an appointment using a local, toll-free or international-friendly phone number. The Texas hospital also provides clear contact information for billing questions and career opportunities.
  • Ease of finding information and getting questions answered. El Camino Hospital’s new website features simple navigation that connects users with answers to their healthcare questions. The website homepage even features estimated ER wait times. This newly redesigned website provides a lot of relevant information, all organized in a structure that makes sense to patients – not just the hospital personnel!
  • Healthcare professional biographies. We worked with Washington, D.C.-based MedStar Health to develop personalized provider biographies for their website. In most cases, we were able to interview the providers to ask for details about their education, experience, clinical expertise and even their personal life. Including provider biographies on a healthcare website is a great way for patients to personally connect with their physician, nurse or midwife.

Originally published on WriterGirl & Associates blog.

El Camino Hospital Debuts Dazzling New Website

el-camino

Want to see an example of a hospital website that puts the patient first?

Take a look at what’s going on at the Silicon-Valley based El Camino Hospital.

True, we’re a bit biased (we helped write 400+ pages of content and still have more to go), but we think you’ll love how it’s easy-to-use, informative and visually appealing — all at the same time.

Here’s what makes it pop:

  • Responsive design. Catering to a patient population that is tech-savvy and likely to access the site from a smartphone or tablet, the website is fully responsive and adaptive when viewed on any device. And of course, the content is, too.
  • ER wait times on homepage. While this may seem like a small detail, including ER wait times front and center on the homepage provides patients with useful information that can help them avoid surprises when they show up for emergency services at the hospital.
  • Simple, streamlined navigation. Designed with patient needs and questions in mind, all major site branches are easily accessible from the landing page. That means patients spend less time hunting around for information they need.

Ready to redesign your website? Contact us today.

Originally published on WriterGirl & Associates blog.

3 Innovative Instagram Posts from Hospitals

instagram

Here’s a stat to think about: There’s more than 300 million monthly active users on Instagram.

Or to put it another way: More people are using Instagram than Twitter.

We love seeing hospitals staying active on this social media platform. Here are a few ideas to inspire your account:

  • Houston Methodist (@housetonmethodist) “We Noticed You” highlights an exceptional staff member with a photo and quote from a patient showing how great they are. What a nice way to honor staff members who’ve gone above and beyond, as well as to show the community how they’re an outstanding healthcare organization.
  • Baptist Health of Florida (@baptisthealthsf) Family Fit Fest — an ongoing health and fitness initiative that Baptist Health sponsors — includes a weekly healthy eating challenge. For this, an Instagram post contains a collage of three healthy ingredients. It challenges families to create a meal using these ingredients and then, share their photos of the creative, healthy meal.
  • Nebraska Medical Center (@nebraskamed)  Nebraska Medical uses their Instagram as a major component in their fundraising campaigns. They share patient stories to inspire donations and make celebratory posts when certain fundraising milestones are met.

If your healthcare system isn’t on Instagram yet, what are you waiting on? We’d love to see the ingenious ways you can make use of this powerful, image-based social media platform.

Originally published on WriterGirl & Associates blog.

3 Hospitals that Virtually Connect Patients with Loved Ones

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We’ve all been there — a loved one is currently in the hospital, but work, school, childcare or other obligations prevent us from visiting that person. How do we show that we’re thinking about them, even when we’re unable to visit? Our three clients have found a creative solution to that dilemma:

  • Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health – As a service available for any current inpatient at Riley Hospital, a loved one can complete a simple online form and an eCard greeting will be sent to the patient. The eCard service is offered during weekdays.
  • Baptist Health of Kentucky – Send any patient who is currently in the Emergency Room or receiving outpatient surgery or diagnostic testing an eCard, which will be delivered by a volunteer within 24 hours, Monday through Friday.
  • Broward Health of Florida – Choose a personalized image and send an eCard to anyone currently in a Broward Health facility.

Best of all, eCard services are free to the patient’s friends and family, as they are delivered by volunteers at most healthcare facilities. What a great way to show someone you care and are thinking about them, when you aren’t actually able to visit the hospital.

Originally published on WriterGirl & Associates blog.

Patient Portal: If You Build It, Patients Will Come

man-on-laptop

Online patient portals are all the buzz these days — and for good reason. They can provide a variety of benefits and services to your staff and your patients, in a digital format that’s familiar to more and more patient demographics. And what’s even better, patients are interested in using online patient portals:

Benefits of Patient Portals

Need to convince your C-suite into a letting you build a patient portal? Here are some of the benefits to tout:

  • Communicate more effectively: Both doctors and patients can see all history and information at a single glance, allowing them to quickly spot trends and pinpoint problems.
  • Reduce phone call volume: Patients can book appointments on the portal, freeing up office staff to attend to patients who are in the office for their appointments.
  • Request prescription refills: The ability to refill prescriptions online can also reduce in-office patient wait time since prescriptions can be refilled outside of the office visit.
  • Share records with specialists: Portals provide the physician with the ability to securely and easily share complete or selected medical records with a specialist who needs to collaborate in the patient’s care.

Attracting Users to Your Portal

At the same time, simply establishing a patient portal at your facility isn’t enough to drive real, sustainable engagement of your patients and providers.

Ensure that you’ve developed (and received buy-in) on a plan of spreading the word about your portal to patients, physicians, nurses and staff members. A widespread marketing campaign can help everyone understand the benefits of the portal.

In addition, speak with the representative from your portal software provider for tips on the best ways that various members of your staff can most effectively and appropriately share information about the features and benefits of your portal. You’ll want to make sure you spread the gospel of your online portal to patients of all ages and demographics.

Originally published on WriterGirl & Associates blog.