Patient Portal: If You Build It, Patients Will Come

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Online patient portals are all the buzz these days — and for good reason. They can provide a variety of benefits and services to your staff and your patients, in a digital format that’s familiar to more and more patient demographics. And what’s even better, patients are interested in using online patient portals:

Benefits of Patient Portals

Need to convince your C-suite into a letting you build a patient portal? Here are some of the benefits to tout:

  • Communicate more effectively: Both doctors and patients can see all history and information at a single glance, allowing them to quickly spot trends and pinpoint problems.
  • Reduce phone call volume: Patients can book appointments on the portal, freeing up office staff to attend to patients who are in the office for their appointments.
  • Request prescription refills: The ability to refill prescriptions online can also reduce in-office patient wait time since prescriptions can be refilled outside of the office visit.
  • Share records with specialists: Portals provide the physician with the ability to securely and easily share complete or selected medical records with a specialist who needs to collaborate in the patient’s care.

Attracting Users to Your Portal

At the same time, simply establishing a patient portal at your facility isn’t enough to drive real, sustainable engagement of your patients and providers.

Ensure that you’ve developed (and received buy-in) on a plan of spreading the word about your portal to patients, physicians, nurses and staff members. A widespread marketing campaign can help everyone understand the benefits of the portal.

In addition, speak with the representative from your portal software provider for tips on the best ways that various members of your staff can most effectively and appropriately share information about the features and benefits of your portal. You’ll want to make sure you spread the gospel of your online portal to patients of all ages and demographics.

Originally published on WriterGirl & Associates blog.

Apples & Oranges

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I’ve been fortunate to have been able to get involved in some B2C projects lately–both on the research and writing fronts. The new B2C projects have been mostly in the CPG industry and, interestingly, the target for most of these projects has been the same: mom. Wow, what a very different audience than the payments processing customers for whom I’ve been researching, designing and writing since July 2013 at Vantiv!

I’m always thankful for the great volume of B2B projects I’ve had over the past 2 years of freelancing, but have been eager to expand my skills into the consumer side of things. Writing for consumers is so incredibly different than writing for B2B industries. I really like that image I found for this blog; the old “apples and oranges” adage is certainly applicable here.

Much of the B2B writing I’ve done is more on the technical writing side–like a whole lot of system documentation and instructions at Vantiv. In that kind of writing, getting your point across very clearly and efficiently is most important. In consumer-facing writing these characteristics, of course, continue to be important–but it’s also key that your writing grabs the attention of your audience. For virtually every product or service consumer marketing is trying to sell, the competition is stiff. B2C marketers have literally mere seconds to capture their target audience’s time and attention. With the continual onslaught of information in today’s technological age, consumers’ attention span has grown increasingly short.

This kind of short-form writing has been a new challenge for me–one that I’m excited to tackle and know that I am improving in with each day! I hope to continue to take on a wide variety of projects throughout 2015–and beyond.

Writing, Editing and Project Managing for WriterGirl

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I’ve recently began writing some blog posts (they’re not live quite yet, though) for WriterGirl, a digital healthcare content company for which I’ve been an associate for almost a year now. It’s been a great experience working with the folks there; I started out as a writer–which I continue to do and enjoy–but have also recently began picking up projects as an editor and a project manager. I love new adventures!

Anyway, I was cruising their blog this morning and came across this recent post by Jessica entitled “5 Lessons Every Marketer Can Learn from Frozen.” It’s a very fun and informative article! I always love a good Disney reference. Be sure to check it out!

Blogging…Professionally!

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I got my first regular, professional blogging gig last week. As popular of a digital content type that it is, the vast majority of the writing I’ve done professionally so far has been static website content–mostly marketing-type content, but also quite a bit of technical writing. I’m a long-winded academic at heart, so taking on a longer-form project is always fun for me! I’ll be blogging regularly for Redstitch, a small digital agency with which I’ve worked for almost 2 years now. I’ll start with their in-house blog, then we hope to expand our blog offerings to their clients, so I have even more blog-writing projects soon.

Working in tandem with the new inbound marketing guru at Redstitch, the first blog series I developed is a series on marketing personas. This was a great topic with which to start–it’s super critical in today’s market and I have a ton of experience researching, developing and executing content based on targeted personas. Blogs are great because there’s often research involved (my favorite) and they’re a regular, ongoing gig. It will be fun to develop a tone for the Redstitch blog over time and–hopefully–a devoted readership! (Note: the blog isn’t live quite yet, but it should be fairly soon.)

Any tips for me as I begin blogging on digital marketing topics?